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Airport security, my keychain

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Feb. 11th, 2007 | 12:03 am

When I was 14 I found a brass cow tag while walking through a pasture owned by a friend of my grand parents.

It had the number 42 on it.

I have carried it with me ever since.

Every so often it sets off a security scanner at an airport. A security person will open my bag, take a look at it, and waive me through. At most this happens every two years.

No one though has ever taken the keys and rerun them, by themselves, though the x-ray machine.

That changed this morning when the Swedish security guard just had to run the keys through the security device by themselves.

Just my keys in a plastic bin going through the x-ray machine. Brass cow tag and all.

It is brass, how is it ever going to be a threat?

In other news, the war on moisturizor is being enforced in Europe now.

Is this a sign that Europe is about to one up the US and start the war on brass cow tags? Is this just a response to the war on glitter?

Or could it just be because we make them take their shoes off when they visit the US?

Looking at the styles popular in Europe right now it must be a real pain for most of them to do it

Maybe they just fear a waive of Cows with Guns!

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Comments {8}

You can call me Edith

(no subject)

from: weizenwind
date: Feb. 11th, 2007 04:18 pm (UTC)
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Wow, I wonder how old that is? When I was growing up the cows all wore plastic tags.

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Brian "Krow" Aker

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from: krow
date: Feb. 12th, 2007 03:00 pm (UTC)
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No idea. Cows still had brass tags though when I was a child though :)

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(no subject)

from: jamesd
date: Feb. 11th, 2007 08:54 pm (UTC)
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Just travel through Frankfurt airport if you want to see systematic application of the stupidity.

Your brass key tag is a threat because it can be rubbed against the key to produce a sharp edge and stuck to the end of a melted plastic knife to produce a shank. At least, I suppose that's one way to make a shank out of it. The security rules, of course, take no practical account of the ease with which prisoners routinely demonstrate that shanks can be made out of a huge range of materials.

Really, I suppose running the keys through the metal detector on their own is just a way to avoid them tripping some sort of metal-based alarm. Were they in the bag or in your pocket? If in the pocket the brass could be part of a percussion cap to trigger explosives concealed in a body cavity. No that you need any metal at all to make a working percussion cap.

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professor_mom

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from: professor_mom
date: Feb. 11th, 2007 11:05 pm (UTC)
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But if all that is the case, jamesd, why not just confiscate the cow tag? After all, if it's a threat, then it makes no sense at all to pass it through in the x-ray machine. No, my theory is that it's thought that the cow tag has a hollowed out place inside of it which can be accessed by pressing on it. The middle part swivels out and plastic explosives are hidden inside of it. What they suspect is that there are hundreds of terrorists with brass veneered cow tags who are going to be on the same plane and combining plastic explosives to make a bomb. This is my theory anyway. They want to make sure there are no plastic explosives hidden in the brass cow tag.

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(no subject)

from: jamesd
date: Feb. 12th, 2007 12:58 am (UTC)
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That they still allowed it through even though it was suitable for making an improvised weapon was the point of that paragraph.

I agree with your theory that it might be because of a concern that it had a hollow section within that contained something else.

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professor_mom

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from: professor_mom
date: Feb. 12th, 2007 03:32 am (UTC)
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I see. *nods* Where their security features are really tripping up is allowing my 10 year old son to get on board without an ID. For all they know, al-kaida is training 10 year old boys all over the world to be terrorists since they can't be traced.

Also, did you know that they let people on airplanes with knitting needles? I knitted an entire pair of booties on my last trip to the coast--no trouble getting the very long metal needles on board. There's an entire generation of old ladies like myself who are a hidden threat to the "free" world.

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(no subject)

from: jamesd
date: Feb. 12th, 2007 05:30 am (UTC)
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Just don't hide a metal knitting needle inside a plastic knitting needle and you'll be fine.

The security procedures are tripping up, or at least shown to be unsuccessful, because of the successful domestic terrorist attacks since they came into force, not because of ten year olds.

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Brian "Krow" Aker

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from: krow
date: Feb. 12th, 2007 03:02 pm (UTC)
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Its not even a centimeter thick. And they ran it through by itself after my bag had already been run with it :)

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