Tap, Tap,... this thing still on?

Oct. 6th, 2012 | 12:47 am

Bueller,... Bueller,... Bueller,...

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MySQL Conference, Percona, the Ecosystem...

Mar. 8th, 2012 | 12:22 am

This year O'Reilly isn't running the MySQL conference, Percona is doing it. Santa Clara, April 10-12. The usual time and place.

This is great news. They run a great conference. They always get rave reviews.

This isn't the first one they've done. They've done San Francisco, New York, London, more.

What's different about Santa Clara?

And for the rest of the story...
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Photoshop'ed Cat?

Jan. 9th, 2012 | 07:47 pm

photo.JPG

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Is it supposed to be a fish?

Jan. 5th, 2012 | 07:45 am

photo.JPG

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Spoon full of Sugar, Oracle and the Open Core Model

Sep. 29th, 2011 | 01:25 pm

(Reposted from blog.krow.net)

From the 451 Group:
“MySQL flirted with the open core licensing model in early 2008 with plans to introduce new features into Enterprise Edition that would not be available under an open source license.”

MySQL didn’t flirt with, it was going to do it.

Why? Because we were asking the question, “how do we pull in customers to make more money”.

MySQL was going to put the new backup API, which never materialized, into an Enterprise branch.

It was a lousy idea for the following reasons:

1) There was no internal API in the server for this, so the engineering was going to be messy and expensive.

2) We didn’t own the technology that was needed to even do this (Oracle owned Hot Backup)

3) Percona has an awesome tool for doing this, that is Open Source (http://www.percona.com/software/percona-xtrabackup/)

4) Backup is a core feature everyone needs, and some of those “everyones” are the folks who manufacture tools that you want to have work with your product.

5) When we were going to announce it, we hadn’t even written it/completed it. It was vaporware.

It would have been a horrible move, and would have caused Chaos for no particular reason. It was dead on arrival, and when it was to be announced as a strategy since it didn’t even exist.

Lets look at Oracle’s move. Both the authentication module, and the Thread Pool come into the MySQL server as plugins. If the engineering of the MySQL server continues in the current direction (which is somewhat flattering to Drizzle I might add), then they are on a good path (if I can find my blog entry where I talked about this as a good strategy, I’ll link back to it here).

Much of the hubbub around Open Source, Community, etc, in regards to this are a bit inflated I feel. They haven’t touched the core product, and they are creating API. Are they possibly hurting themselves in regards to ubiquity?

Doubtful.

Would I pick those two pieces? No, but they aren’t the last two I would pick either. If Sun had continued as a company?

Something similar to this would have been done as well.

From an engineering and usage stand point?

The first person who sniffs at the authentication mechanism who knows anything about security is going to freak.

The Thread Pool can only be used by a very limited number of users (and there are some restrictions on what can be done in the server while it is in use). MySQL’s IO was never designed for the Thread Pool, and there is a lot of engineering work that would need to be done to make it work.

Still? People will use both, and I am betting some customers will want them badly enough to pay.

If they are really badly needed? Well then someone will write an open source version of both.

I have no great love of Oracle, but this is really not a big deal at all. The original GPL’ing of the Public Domain/LGPL clients was a much bigger deal.
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memcached_exist()

Sep. 22nd, 2011 | 11:11 pm

Originally posted on blog.krow.net

New in version 0.53 (which yes, I really should renumber into 1.X at some point in the near future) is memcached_exist().

Ever wanted to find out if a key existed but didn’t want to have to fetch the object?

Well now you can do this. It works by seeing if an add can be done on the key (the add though is dated in the past, so any write afterward will expire it).

You can currently grab the code via bar on Launchpad.

Have fun!

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Dear Lazyweb, how secure is Tomato?

Jul. 21st, 2011 | 10:19 pm

Reposted from blog.krow.net

So today I noticed on one of my internal servers the following:

Jul 17 23:53:13 localhost sshd[31847]: Invalid user sales from 123.196.113.11

Jul 17 23:53:13 localhost sshd[31848]: input_userauth_request: invalid user sales

And I also see….

Jul 17 23:47:11 localhost sshd[31690]: reverse mapping checking getaddrinfo for 42.ac.84ae.static.theplanet.com [174.132.172.66] failed - POSSIBLE BREAK-IN ATTEMPT!

Also?

Jul 20 14:56:01 localhost ¿<28>fail2ban.actions: WARNING [ssh-iptables] Ban 121.88.250.208

Huh? Nothing is port forwarded, and the only thing that could be connecting to the box is a Linksys running 1.28 Tomato.

So I am wondering, is Tomato secure right now?

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Syncing, Google vs OSX, iPhoto Ate my Father's Wedding Pictures

Jul. 7th, 2011 | 03:34 pm

Reposted from blog.krow.net

I don't really love OSX, as much as I happen to be a UNIX bigot. 

Minus the long grey beard.

Why do I like OSX? 

  • Terminal always works.
  • WiFi always works.
  • I love Toasters

Toasters are awesome. You put bread in, you push the bar down and you get toast.

That is until the toaster starts to burn bread because either the dial has been turned all the way up, or the toaster has become so old that the springs are worn out.

iPhotos? iPhotos burns a lot of bread, I mean, it eats a lot of photos. 

It is really irritating to lose photos, especially in the manner that happens with iPhotos. With iPhotos you can see the icon it made of the photo, but the original? It is long gone. I haven't done an exhaustive search of all of the meta data, but you certainly can't export or even view the photos.

A lot of my photos I upload to flickr when I want to store/share them longterm, but I haven't always done that. 

And when I went to show someone a photo from my father's wedding? I discovered that it had once again eaten all of the photos from the wedding. 

So what to do about it? I'm going to go with Picasa. I recently acquired a new NAS (I upgraded from my NV+ Readynas, to a Ultra6 ReadyNas). I have been writing scripts that have been extracting all of the pictures from all my computers. It is opening up tarballs of old home directories and pulling images from them and then storing the images to the NAS. If I could figure out how to deal with Spam I would extract all of the images from my email as well.

Picasa has been running for a couple of dates. It has ~15K of headshots it has found. I thought that iPhotos face recognition was pretty gimmicky. The Google one though? It is sharp. It is finding friend's photos that I didn't know that I had (so much for anonymity during the Fremont Solstice Parade!). My only real complaint with it so far is that I wish I could share the facial recognition information with friends so that we could collectively parse photos. 

Downside? Picasa image display is not that awesome. Its slow, and for some reason someone thought it would be brilliant to include all of the headshots in one window. Which means I have to do a bunch of scrolling to approve photos that it is finding.

Like all programs Picasa needs a kill file

Another downside to Picasa? It is walled garden. I like flickr, I am going to continue to use flickr. It's annoying that I can't sync between the two (maybe Google will buy it?).

At the very least you would think that Gmail would be able to extract photos from email, Or make it easy to share photos between my computers. 

iPhoto did an ok job at editing photos, Picasa is really lacking when it comes to this. I've been meaning to make more use of Lightroom, I guess this will give me a reason.

Next on my list of problems to solve?

Contacts. 

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Mysql State of the Ecosystem 2011

Apr. 19th, 2011 | 12:57 pm

Reposted from blog.krow.net.

A number of years ago I coined the term "the mysql ecosystem". I did it at the time to express a view that MySQL had moved beyond being just what MySQL AB defined "MySQL" as being. 



...click to read more.
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A reminder...

Apr. 18th, 2011 | 08:54 am

The new blog can be found at http://blog.krow.net/

The recent DOS attacks against LJ means that my attempts to keep both in sync is failing, so be sure to update to the new link if you are curious as to what I am up too.

And the recent mysql conference? It was fun, and the ecosystem is doing really well.

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